Archive | Electronic Waste

New States Require TV and PC Recycling

Four additional states have implemented laws banning electronic waste like old computers and televisions from going to landfills.

The Associated Press reported Tuesday that Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania and South Carolina now require consumers to recycle old electronics.

Similar measures are already in effect in a number of states, and with the most recent states to jump onboard included, 24 states now prohibit trashing electronic waste.

Most of the government mandates apply to computers, televisions, personal digital assistants, video game consoles and stereo parts, AP said.

Walter Alcorn of the Consumer Electronics Association told AP that the electronics industry is supportive of recycling, but he did express concern over differing policies in 24 states.

Posted in Electronic Waste, Recycling & Waste0 Comments

China 'e-waste' Recycling Said Hazardous

CORVALLIS, Ore., Aug. 26 (UPI) — Much of the world’s electronic waste ends up in China for recycling, an activity creating significant health and environmental hazards, researchers say.

Scientists from China and Oregon State University have identified toxic elements in the emissions from cottage-industry recycling workshops in southern China that use low-tech methods to separate reusable electronic components from circuit boards, a university release said Thursday.

Their study was conducted in Shantou City, population 150,000, in southern China’s Guangdong province.

They collected samples as workers were removing the electronic components by heating the circuit boards over grills on stoves burning coal briquettes.

In this “roasting process,” researchers found numerous organic chemicals, heavy metals, flame retardants and persistent organic pollutants being emitted into the air via the smoke.

“The most immediate problem is the health of the workers and the people who live in the city,” Bernd R.T. Simoneit, OSU professor and one of the authors of the study, said. “But this may also be contributing to global contamination. For example, previous studies have found carcinogens in wind-carried dust from Asia.

“The next step is to see to what extent this is harming the environment and creating a health hazard for both the workers, and people living in the path of the emissions,” Simoneit said. “Some of these chemical compounds may be carcinogens; others may be just as harmful because they can act as ‘environmental disruptors’ and may affect body processes from reproduction to endocrine function.”

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Carcinogens, Chemicals, Coal, Electronic Waste, Other, Recycling0 Comments

UPI NewsTrack Health and Science News

Argonne photon source lab to be upgraded

ARGONNE, Ill., May 3 (UPI) — Argonne National Laboratory officials estimate the U.S. Department of Energy will spend more than $300 million to upgrade the lab’s photon source facility.

“This is a major step in securing America’s scientific future by taking an already premier facility and preparing it to meet the next generation of scientific needs and discoveries,” said Argonne Director Eric Isaacs.

Officials said the upgrade will be more cost-effective than building a new facility and will make revolutionary improvements in performance needed to address the sustainable energy and health research needs of the future.

“The upgrade will also add new X-ray facilities, make existing X-ray facilities 10 to 100 times more powerful and almost double the number of experiments that can be carried out in a year,” Argonne officials said. “At present, the Argonne Photon Source serves the experimental needs of more than 3,500 researchers each year, more than any other scientific user facility in the Western Hemisphere.”

Scientists said the Advanced Photon Source uses high-energy X-ray beams to explore the atomic and molecular structures of materials and living organisms as small as a few nanometers, enabling breakthroughs such as improved battery technologies, an unprecedented understanding of how engine fuel injectors function, treatment of the human immunodeficiency virus and other diseases, the creation of nanomaterials, and advances in nanobiology, among other developments.

Two new genes linked to autism

VANCOUVER, British Columbia, May 3 (UPI) — U.S. researchers said they have identified two additional genes that may be linked with autism.

Study co-author Ning Lei of Princeton University and the Institute for Advanced Studies says there is no known cause of autism, but mutations of several genes have been linked to autism.

Lei and colleagues analyzed data from the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange on 943 families who had more than one child diagnosed with autism and had undergone genetic testing.

Investigators compared the prevalence of 25 gene mutations that appeared in the study participants’ families with a control group of 6,317 individuals.

The study identified mutations in four genes within the study group families — two of the genes have been previously linked to autism.

One of the new genes identified was neural cell adhesion molecule 2 (NCAM2) — linked to the hippocampus in the brain — a region of the brain that has been associated with autism.

“While mutations in the NCAM2 gene were found in a small percentage of the children that we studied, it is fascinating that this finding continues a consistent story — that many of the genes associated with autism are involved with formation or function of the neural synapse,” Lei said in a statement.

“Studies such as this provide evidence that autism is a genetically based disease that affects neural connectivity.”

The findings were presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in Vancouver.

E-waste increasing in developing world

TUCSON, May 3 (UPI) — U.S. scientists said they’ve determined developing nations will produce at least twice as much electronic waste as developed countries by 2016.

A study by Assistant Professor Eric Williams and colleagues at Arizona State University also foresees that by 2030 developing countries will be discarding up to 700 million obsolete personal computers per year compared to 300 million by developed countries.

Williams said not only is there a continuing increase in ownership of PCs and other electronic devices worldwide, but at the same time technological advances are shrinking the lifetime of consumer electronics so people discard the products sooner than ever before.

“Our central assertion is that the new structure of global e-waste generation … combined with economic and social considerations, call for a serious reconsideration of e-waste policy,” the researchers said.

The findings are detailed in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Prostate cancer drugs under safety review

WASHINGTON, May 3 (UPI) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Monday it is reviewing the safety of several commonly used prostate cancer drugs.

The FDA said a preliminary review suggests an increase in the risk of diabetes and certain cardiovascular diseases in men treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists.

“GnRH agonists are drugs that suppress the production of testosterone, a hormone that is involved in the growth of prostate cancer,” the FDA said. “This type of treatment is called androgen deprivation therapy. Suppressing testosterone has been shown to shrink or slow the growth of prostate cancer.”

The drugs under review are Lupron, Trelstar, Eligard, Synarel, Vantas, Viadur and Zoladex.

Officials said the medications have been associated with a small increased risk of diabetes, heart attack, stroke and sudden death in men.

Based on those initial findings, the FDA said it believes healthcare professionals should be aware of the potential risks and carefully weigh the benefits and risks of GnRH agonists when determining a treatment for patients with prostate cancer.

However, the FDA said patients should not stop treatment unless instructed to do so by a healthcare professional.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Electronic Waste, Other0 Comments

E-waste Increasing in Developing World

TUCSON, May 3 (UPI) — U.S. scientists said they’ve determined developing nations will produce at least twice as much electronic waste as developed countries by 2016.

A study by Assistant Professor Eric Williams and colleagues at Arizona State University also foresees that by 2030 developing countries will be discarding up to 700 million obsolete personal computers per year compared to 300 million by developed countries.

Williams said not only is there a continuing increase in ownership of PCs and other electronic devices worldwide, but at the same time technological advances are shrinking the lifetime of consumer electronics so people discard the products sooner than ever before.

“Our central assertion is that the new structure of global e-waste generation … combined with economic and social considerations, call for a serious reconsideration of e-waste policy,” the researchers said.

The findings are detailed in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Electronic Waste, Other0 Comments

Plastic Bags Recycled into Batteries at Argonne National Laboratory

ARGONNE, Ill., Dec. 22 (UPI) — Plastic bags found in abundance at grocery stores could be recycled into carbon nanotubes, a component in lithium ion batteries, an Illinois scientist said.

Vilas Pol, of Argonne National Laboratory 25-miles southwest of Chicago, developed the process as a way to turn plastic waste into an energy resource, the Southtown Star reported Tuesday.

With cobalt acetate as a catalyst, plastic bags were heated to 1,292 degrees Fahrenheit, which caused the carbon in the plastic to grow as nanotubes on the cobalt particles, Pol said, noting the process could be used on plastic water bottles and plastic cups.

The cobalt acetate, which is relatively expensive, could be recovered when the batteries were recycled, Pol said. Performing the process without cobalt acetate yields carbon spheres that could be used in printer ink.

Yet to be determined is how to collect enough bags to make the project cost efficient, Pol said. Recycling programs find the bags difficult to collect because they often get swept up in air currents, causing a problem for curbside collectors and recycling centers.

Copyright 2009 by United Press International

Posted in Consumer Products, Consumer Waste, Electronic Waste, Electronics, House & Home, Packaging, Recycling, Recycling & Waste, Science, Space, & Technology0 Comments

Make Money By Recycling Electronic Waste

As the use of technology increase a new kind waste also increase; electronic waste. Computers, cell phones, mp3 players, and even DVDs are all considered electronic waste. The problem with recycling electronic waste is how to do so properly with out causing more waste in both domestic and foreign landfills.

A new method of recycling electronic waste is by giving it to specialty companies that will exchange money for the waste. These companies will collect different types of waste, inspect, and either re-certify the product for sale in secondary markets or properly dispose of the item. This saves the consumer time and puts money back in their pockets for handling their electronic waste correctly.

YouRenew.com is a company that specializes in recycling electronic waste and frequently promote their services outside of Apple, Inc.’s flag ship store in New York City. Founders Bob Casey and Rich Littlehale believe that they can help curb e-waste by offering incentives and ease of disposal services to consumers looking to get rid of their unused electronics.

Visit the following link for more information on electronic waste recycling and YouRenew’s services.

Posted in Electronic Waste, Electronics, Landfills, Recycling, Recycling & Waste, Science, Space, & Technology, Services1 Comment


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