Archive | Ozone

Planned Climate Satellite Gets Final Part

WASHINGTON, July 23 (UPI) — The final experimental instrument has been added to a new NASA weather and climate satellite set to be launched into polar orbit in late 2001, the agency says.

An advanced atmospheric sensor, the Cross-track Infrared Sounder, has been successfully integrated into the Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System, a National Aeronautics and Space Administration release said Thursday.

It joins four other instruments that will collect and distribute remotely sensed land, ocean, and atmospheric data back to Earth.

NPOESS will provide atmospheric and sea surface temperatures, humidity sounding, land and ocean biological productivity, cloud and aerosol properties and total/profile ozone measurements, NASA said.

Once launched, the NPOESS satellite program will be managed by a tri-agency program made up of NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Department of Defense, NASA said.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Other, Ozone0 Comments

Hazard Seen from Burning Leaking Oil

LOS ANGELES, June 18 (UPI) — Burning off oil from the ruined Deepwater Horizon well in the Gulf of Mexico creates toxic byproducts that could be a health hazard, one expert says.

Dr. Phil Harber, head of Occupational and Environmental Medicine division at UCLA, says people living on nearby shorelines could be affected, CNN reported Friday.

Depending on the scope and duration of the burn, Harber said, “People with asthma, or who are very young, or who have cardiac disease, are much more likely to be sensitive the released pollutants.”

The black cloud rising from the cleanup burn contains small particles that can wind up in the lungs. Gases such as sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide, and volatile hydrocarbons are also a health concern, CNN said.

The Environmental Protection Agency says air-quality levels for ozone and particulates on the Gulf Coast are no different from usual for this time of year.

But hospitals have reported complaints from several dozen cleanup workers of headaches, nausea and dizziness, CNN reported.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Hydrogen, Other, Ozone0 Comments

Strategy Outlined to Limit Global Warming

SAN DIEGO, May 10 (UPI) — U.S. scientists say they’ve identified three methods nations can use to meet the goal of limiting the increase of global average temperatures.

Major greenhouse gas-emitting countries last December agreed substantial action is required to limit global warming to less than 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit.

In the new study, researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California-San Diego identified three avenues by which that goal can be reached.

The scientists — Veerabhadran Ramanathan and Yangyang Xu — said exceeding that warming threshold is a point which many experts say likely would trigger irreversible phenomena such as widespread release of methane from melting permafrost and large-scale glacial melt that would exacerbate climate change-related problems, such as sea-level rise and acceleration of global warming.

The first and second recommended steps include stabilizing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and fashioning warming-neutral pollution laws to balance removal of aerosols that have an atmospheric cooling effect with the removal of warming agents such as soot and ozone.

Thirdly, the researchers advocate achieving immediate cooling through reductions in methane, hydrofluorocarbons and other greenhouse gases that last in the atmosphere for short periods of time.

They said simultaneous pursuit of the strategies could reduce the probability of reaching the temperature threshold to less than 10 percent before the year 2050.

The research is detailed in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Other, Ozone0 Comments

EPA Monitoring Gulf Air and Water

WASHINGTON, May 8 (UPI) — As crude oil makes its way inland from the Gulf of Mexico, the U.S. government has set up equipment to monitor air and water quality, officials said.

Officials of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said since the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico April 22, the agency has been monitoring and responding to potential public health and environmental concerns.

Air quality monitoring near Venice, La., indicated elevated levels of hydrogen sulfide at one monitor on Wednesday and two monitors Thursday and people near this area may have smelled what smells like rotten eggs. However, the source of the hydrogen sulfide is not known, the EPA said.

Inhaling the hydrogen sulfide may have caused irritation of the eyes, nose or throat, the EPA Web site said.

EPA’s emergency response teams also put up monitoring stations to monitor larger particulate matter. People may see elevated levels of particulate matter — at moderate levels — along the Gulf — but this is not due to the presence of the crude oil, particulate matter or ozone is not uncommon in the Gulf coast area this time of year from other man-made sources such as factories, power plants, or cars.

EPA health monitoring is at: http://www.epa.gov/bpspill/air.html.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Cars, Hydrogen, Other, Ozone0 Comments

Animal Feed and Cars Equal Smog Hotspot

DAVIS, Calif., April 22 (UPI) — U.S. scientists have determined the combination of lots of animal feed fumes mixing with automotive exhaust gases can become a major source of smog.

University of California-Davis researchers said their finding solves a long-standing mystery of why California’s San Joaquin Valley — a moderately populated agricultural region — has higher levels of ozone than many densely populated cities.

Ozone is one of the main ingredients in smog.

The scientists, led by Professor Michael Kleeman, say their report explains how fermented cattle feed works with automotive exhaust to produce the high ozone levels in the San Joaquin Valley — an area that produces 10 percent of America’s food supply.

The researchers said their study documents how emissions of reactive organic gases from seven different animal feeds combine with combustion emissions and sunlight to form smog. It shows how fermented feed, such as silage, appears to be the largest man-made source of the organic gases that contribute to ozone formation in the valley — even more than automobiles.

They said the until-now-unrecognized animal-feed factor might explain the failure of traditional vehicle smog control regulations in the area.

The research is reported in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Other, Ozone0 Comments

Inhalers Containing CFC's Being Eliminated

WASHINGTON, April 13 (UPI) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration says some inhalers used by asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients are being phased out.

The FDA said seven metered-dose inhalers that contain ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons will be gradually removed from the U.S. marketplace. Alternative medications that do not contain the ozone-destroying chemicals are available, the federal agency said.

The affected products and their phase out schedule are:

– Tilade Inhaler (nedocromil), made by King Pharmaceuticals. Last date for sale: June 14.

– Alupent Inhalation Aerosol (metaproterenol), made by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals. Last date for sale: June 14.

– Azmacort Inhalation Aerosol (triamcinolone), made by Abbott Laboratories. Last date for sale: Dec. 31.

– Intal Inhaler (cromolyn), made by King Pharmaceuticals. Last date for sale: Dec. 31.

– Aerobid Inhaler System (flunisolide), made by Forest Laboratories. Last date for sale: June 30.

– Combivent Inhalation Aerosol (albuterol and ipratropium in combination), made by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals. Last date for sale: Dec. 31, 2013

– Maxair Autohaler (pirbuterol), made by Graceway Pharmaceuticals. Last date for sale: Dec. 31, 2013.

Patients using the inhalers scheduled to be phased out should talk to their health care professional about switching to one of several alternative treatments currently available, the FDA said.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Chemicals, Other, Ozone0 Comments

Study Warns of Environment Tipping Points

MINNEAPOLIS, March 29 (UPI) — A U.S. scientist says people need to pay more attention to all of Earth’s environmental processes because many of them are reaching critical tipping points.

University of Minnesota Professor Jon Foley, director of the university’s Institute on the Environment, said climate change is the focus of much of today’s political debate, but other indicators of Earth’s health are just as important.

Foley argues that while climate change gets ample attention, species loss and nitrogen pollution exceed safe limits by greater degrees. And he says such environmental processes as ocean acidification and stratospheric ozone depletion are also moving toward dangerous thresholds.

The professor says swift action is needed to address developments that move the global environment and human life into dangerous new territory. He said the first steps should include promptly switching to low-carbon energy sources, curtailing land clearing and revolutionizing agricultural practices.

The research is featured as part of the cover story of Scientific American magazine’s April issue.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Effects Of Air Pollution, Other, Ozone0 Comments

Federal Agents Seize 77 Ozone Generating Medical Devices at Request of FDA

WASHINGTON, Feb. 1 (UPI) — Federal marshals, at the request of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, have seized 77 ozone generators because they had not been proved safe or effective.

The FDA said the generators, models AOS-1M and AOS-1MD valued at $75,000, were seized from Applied Ozone Systems of Auburn, Calif.

FDA inspectors said the medical devices were said to treat cancer, AIDS, hepatitis, herpes and other diseases and conditions, but were produced under poor manufacturing conditions and posed public health risk

“The FDA advises healthcare professionals and consumers to discontinue use of these devices … (because) the FDA has not determined that the seized products are safe and effective in treating the diseases or conditions, and officials at Applied Ozone Systems never responded to a Dec. 21, 2009, FDA request for a voluntary recall of these ozone generators.

“In addition, the agency is concerned that patients who use these AOS ozone devices as directed by the manufacturer may believe that ozone therapy serves as an appropriate treatment and as a result delay or stop conventional or prescribed effective treatment.” officials said. “There is also a risk of infection from potential contamination of the applicator or catheter.”

Ozone generators are devices that produce ozone from oxygen. FDA officials said administration methods suggested by the manufacturer of the seized generators include using a catheter to blow ozonized air into rectal and vaginal areas.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Ailments & Diseases, Healthy Living, Human Health & Wellness, Ozone0 Comments

Obama Sets Greenhouse Gas Reduction Target

WASHINGTON, Jan. 29 (UPI) — The federal government will reduce its greenhouse gas pollution by 28 percent by 2020, U.S. President Barack Obama said Friday.

Hitting the pollution reduction target will reduce the government’s energy use by the equivalent of 646 trillion BTUs — equal to 205 million barrels of oil and taking 17 million cars off the road for a year, Obama said in a statement.

“As the single largest energy consumer in the U.S. economy, the federal government spent more than $24.5 billion on electricity and fuel in 2008 alone,” he said.

The president said the cumulative saving would be the equivalent of $8 billion to $11 billion in avoided energy costs through 2020.

“As the largest energy consumer in the United States, we have a responsibility to American citizens to reduce our energy use and become more efficient,” Obama said. “Our goal is to lower costs, reduce pollution, and shift Federal energy expenses away from oil and towards local, clean energy.”

Federal departments and agencies can achieve greenhouse gas pollution reductions by measuring current energy and fuel use, being more energy efficient and moving to clean energy sources such as solar, wind and geothermal, Obama said.

On Oct. 5, Obama signed an executive order that set measurable environmental performance goals for federal agencies.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Cars, Electricity, Geothermal, Ozone, Solar0 Comments

Scientists Create Small Ozone Sensor

FREIBURG, Germany, Jan. 27 (UPI) — German scientists say they’ve developed a highly sensitive, miniaturized mobile ozone sensor that can operate in the air or water.

The researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics note ozone is a powerful oxidizing agent and can cause a wide range of symptoms in humans, including headaches, coughing and even deterioration in lung function.

“Since ozone is, at the same time, an agent with high application potential, novel sensors are required, which have to be compact and affordable,” Fraunhofer project manager Volker Cimalla said. “Sensors are essential equipment in industrial settings such as wastewater treatment facilities and water sterilization units, where they are used to monitor the ozone concentration — firstly to ensure the required concentration for the relevant application is maintained, and secondly to guard against exceeding hazardous thresholds for humans.”

Cimalla said the newly developed sensor is capable of measuring low ozone levels that occur in environmental and ambient air monitoring just as accurately as the high levels associated with industrial process control. And, he added, since the sensor is extremely small, it can even be integrated into mobile equipment.

The sensor’s capabilities are detailed in the January issue of Fraunhofer Research News.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Ozone0 Comments

No Posts in Category
Advertisement