Excessive Cleanliness May Boost Allergies

MONTREAL, April 14 (UPI) — Excessive cleanliness may be to blame for people suffering from allergies, a researcher in Montreal says.

Dr. Guy Delespesse, a professor at the Universite de Montreal and director of the Laboratory for Allergy Research, says allergies can be linked to family history, air pollution, processed foods, stress and tobacco use, but there is an inverse relationship between the level of hygiene and the incidence of allergies and autoimmune diseases.


“The more sterile the environment a child lives in, the higher the risk he or she will develop allergies or an immune problem in their lifetime,” Delespesse says in a statement

Hygiene is necessary and reduces exposure to harmful bacteria, but it may also limit exposure to beneficial microorganisms and the bacterial flora of the digestive system isn’t what it used to be, Delespesse says.

In 1980, 10 percent of the Western population suffered from allergies, but within 30 years that number jumped to 30 percent, Delespesse says.

Delespesse recommends probiotics — found in yogurt — to boost beneficial microorganisms.

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Categorized | History, Microorganisms, Other
One Response to “Excessive Cleanliness May Boost Allergies”
  1. ann russell says:

    It astounds me when I read such abject nonsense from serious researchers. You are overlooking the very obvious cause of allergies in a so-called sterile environment. In order to render such environments clean or “sterile” requires the use of cleaning agents such as personal hygience items which contain perfumes, and other chemicals for sanitizing and killing germs. As a life-long sufferer of allergies–for more than seventy years, I have to be scrupulously careful about cleaning preparations of all kinds; everything from furniture polish to underarm deodorants, shampoos, conditioners and so forth which make me wheeze and can cause severe asthma attacks with prolonged exposure. It isn’t the “dirt” that’s providing the protection from allergic reactions–in fact I grew up in a filthy, unkempt home. I went to a residential school in England where there were 80 of us girls mostly severe asthmatics who for the most part came from similarly filthy homes. During our time at school which was scrupulously clean, none of us were sick. Please don’t go advocating that kids wallow in dirt in order to be healthy; as you can see the lunatic press has taken up your theme with gay abandon and this is wrong. Yes, and whilst you’re at it you should start looking at the affects of vaccines and all those foreign proteins which are being deposited in the bloodstream of previously healthy babies, but then I see you have extensive ties to the pharmaceutical industry, so likely won’t want to go there.

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