Aspirin Doesn't Prevent Many Heart Attacks

VANCOUVER, British Columbia, Aug. 5 (UPI) — A low-dose aspirin taken daily only reduces the risk of a first heart attack by less than 1 percent, Canadian researchers found.

Study co-authors Dr. Michael Bayliss, a cardiologist now working in Ontario, and Dr. Andrew Ignaszewski, head of the University of British Columbia’s division of cardiology at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, said they found a daily aspirin reduces the risk of having a first heart attack, a stroke or death from vascular disease by .06 percent per year, the Vancouver Sun reported Thursday.


However, the study authors said previous studies showed for those with a history of heart attacks, an aspirin reduces the risk of another attack by 20 percent and reduced the risk of stroke in women.

The study, published in the British Columbia Medical Journal, said there is no evidence that an aspirin reduces the risk of heart attacks for women or diabetics.

The study authors said it is not known why aspirin might affect men more than women but it might have something to do with how the drug is metabolized in the presence of male and female hormones.

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