Archive | Education

Committed Teen Sex Does Not Affect Grades

ATLANTA, Aug. 16 (UPI) — Sexual intercourse between U.S. teens in committed romantic relationships is often academically harmless, compared to abstinence, researchers found.

Sociologists Bill McCarthy of the University of California-Davis and Eric Grodsky of the University of Minnesota said their study considered nine education measures of high-school students, who had sex in an committed relationship, sex in an uncommitted relationship and among abstainers. The nine measures were: school attachment, high-school grade point average, college aspiration, college expectations, problems in school, truancy, the number of days truant, school sanctions such as being suspended or expelled and dropping out.

“Compared to abstinence, sexual intercourse in committed romantic relationships is often academically harmless, whereas in other types of relationships it is more detrimental,” McCarthy and Grodsky said in a statement. “Females and males who have sex only with romantic partners are generally similar to abstainers on most of the education measures we examined.”

However, the researchers said teens who have sex only with partners with whom they are not romantically involved were at greater risk of — experiencing problems in school, being suspended or expelled, being less likely to expect to attend college, being less attached to school and getting lower grades.

The findings, presented at the American Sociological Association’s 105th annual meeting, raise doubts about the veracity of sexual education programs that link adolescent sex to a plethora of negative outcomes, the researchers said.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Education, Other0 Comments

Grown Kids Affect Parental Mental Health

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind., Aug. 15 (UPI) — U.S. researchers suggest parents react more strongly to their grown children’s failures rather than their children’s successes.

Karen Fingerman of Purdue University, in West Lafayette, Ind., and colleagues asked 633 middle-age Philadelphia parents to compare each of their grown children’s achievements in relationships, family life, education and career to their children’s peers, and to answer questions about their own psychological well-being, their relationships with their children and the specific problems children may have had.

The researchers find 68 percent of parents had at least one grown child suffering at least one problem in the last two years, while 49 percent of parents said at least one of their children was highly successful, 60 percent say they had a mix of successful and less successful children, 17 percent say they had no children suffering problems and 15 percent say they had no children they considered to be above average on life achievements.

Having even one problematic child had a negative impact on their mental health, even if the other children were successful,” Fingerman says in a statement. “Simply having at least one successful child was not associated with better well-being.”

The findings were presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association in San Diego.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Education, Other0 Comments

Grown Kids Affect Parental Mental Health

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind., Aug. 15 (UPI) — U.S. researchers suggest parents react more strongly to their grown children’s failures rather than their children’s successes.

Karen Fingerman of Purdue University, in West Lafayette, Ind., and colleagues asked 633 middle-age Philadelphia parents to compare each of their grown children’s achievements in relationships, family life, education and career to their children’s peers, and to answer questions about their own psychological well-being, their relationships with their children and the specific problems children may have had.

The researchers find 68 percent of parents had at least one grown child suffering at least one problem in the last two years, while 49 percent of parents said at least one of their children was highly successful, 60 percent say they had a mix of successful and less successful children, 17 percent say they had no children suffering problems and 15 percent say they had no children they considered to be above average on life achievements.

Having even one problematic child had a negative impact on their mental health, even if the other children were successful,” Fingermann says in a statement. “Simply having at least one successful child was not associated with better well-being.”

The findings were presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association in San Diego.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Education, Other0 Comments

Good Child Nutrition Takes a Village

CHICAGO, Aug. 11 (UPI) — U.S. schools and communities share the responsibility to provide students with access to high-quality, affordable, nutritious food, nutrition experts say.

Registered dietitians Ethan A. Bergman of Central Washington University in Ellensburg, Wash., and Ruth Gordon of Gordon Consulting LLC in Atlanta wrote the updated position paper on local support for nutrition integrity for the American Dietetic Association, which is published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

“Nutrition integrity means that, when all foods and beverages are consistent with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and when nutrition education, physical activity and a healthful school environment are ensured, learning is enhanced and students develop lifelong, healthful eating habits,” the authors say in a statement.

The position paper says:

– School-based nutrition services, including the National School Lunch Program and the School Breakfast Program, are part of a total education program.

– The Dietary Guidelines for Americans should apply to all foods and beverages sold or served to students during the school day.

– Strong local wellness policies promote healthy school environments and nutrition integrity.

– All children should eat breakfast.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Education, Other, Policies & Solutions0 Comments

Prison Rates for Parents of Black Teens

MADISON, N.J., Aug. 10 (UPI) — More than half of black U.S. children with a low-education parent will experience having a parent behind bars by age 14, researchers found.

Julie Poehlmann of the Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and colleagues estimated that at any one time, 1.7 million, or 2.3 percent, of all U.S. children have a parent in prison.

Problems — the children tend to have more arrests; more problems with behavior, relationships, school and substance abuse — are particularly acute when the mother is in jail or prison.

“It’s more likely that the child will move out of house, and be placed with grandparents,” Poehlmann said in a statement. “They are more likely to change schools and have a higher risk of substance abuse and the father is also likely to be incarcerated.

“Children of incarcerated parent are at least two-and-a-half times more likely to be incarcerated themselves,” she said.

A strong, close attachment with the alternative caregiver can mitigate a teen’s problems, Poehlmann said.

Nonetheless, despite the risks, 25 percent to 30 percent of children escape the worst harm, Poehlmann finds.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Education, Other0 Comments

24 Countries Have Banned All Spanking

CHAPEL HILL, N.C., Aug. 10 (UPI) — Twenty-four countries — only 12 percent of the world’s nations — have banned all corporal punishment, U.S. researchers found.

Dr. Adam J. Zolotor, assistant professor of family medicine in the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill, and colleagues conducted a systematic review of the laws and changes in attitudes and behaviors in countries that have adopted bans on corporal punishment since the passage of the Convention on the Rights of the Child in 1979.

The United Nations adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child in 1979, which covers everything from a child’s right to be free from sexual and economic exploitation, to the right to education, healthcare and economic opportunity.

Currently, 193 nations have signed to enforce the treaty, but not the United States and Somalia, Zolotor said. Thirty U.S. states have banned corporal punishment in schools, while 20 — all in the South and West — have not.

Of the 24 countries with corporal punishment bans at school and at home, 19 are in Europe. Three are in Central or South America, one in the Middle East and one in Oceania.

The findings are published in the July/August issue of the journal Child Abuse Review.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Education, Other0 Comments

Popeye Not Just About Spinach Anymore

BANGKOK, Aug. 9 (UPI) — Children watching Popeye cartoons results in them eating more vegetables, and not just spinach, researchers in Thailand say.

The researchers at Mahidol University in Bangkok included Popeye cartoons as part of a nutrition education program that succeeded in doubling the intake of vegetables in kindergarten children.

Popeye is the heroic sailor who, since 1929, has downed cans of spinach to become super strong so he can defeat Brutus and other bad guys.

The study, published in Nutrition & Dietetics, also finds the program helped children increase the types of vegetables eaten from 2-4. Parents reported their children were proud to eat vegetables.

“We got the children planting vegetable seeds, taking part in fruit and vegetable tasting parties, cooking vegetable soup and watching Popeye cartoons,” lead researcher Chutima Sirikulchayanonta said in a statement. “We also sent letters to parents with tips on encouraging their kids to eat fruit and vegetables and teachers sat with children at lunch to role model healthy eating.”

Sirikulchayanonta and colleagues recorded fruit and vegetable intake in 26 children ages 4-5, both before and after introducing them to the program using multimedia and role models to promote healthy eating.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Education, Other0 Comments

Africa Cellphone Benefits Need Support

DALLAS, Aug. 9 (UPI) — The explosive growth of cellphone use in Africa isn’t enough to drive the continent’s economic growth without accompanying infrastructure, economic experts say.

Researchers at Southern Methodist University say that while there is evidence of positive short-term impacts, so far there’s limited evidence mobile phones have led to large-scale improvements in African countries, a university release says.

Cellphones can do only so much, the researchers say, as long as many Africans still struggle in poverty and still lack reliable electricity, clean drinking water, education or access to roads.

“It’s really great for a farmer to find out the price of beans in the market,” said SMU economist Isaac Mbiti, who has seen the impact of the cellphone boom firsthand in his native Kenya.

“But if a farmer can’t get the beans to market because there is no road, the information doesn’t really help. Cellphones can’t replace things you need from development, like roads and running water.”

Mobile phone coverage has jumped from 10 percent of the population in 1999 to 60 percent in 2008 despite the extreme poverty of many Africans, Mbiti’s research found.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Drinking Water, Education, Electricity, Infrastructure, Other0 Comments

Eating Produce Can Reduce Dementia Risk

LONDON, Aug. 7 (UPI) — The known genetic link for dementia accounts for only 7 percent of cases and British and French researchers suggest people could do more to prevent dementia.

Researchers at Imperial College, St. Mary’s Hospital, London, and the Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale in France say people can reduce their risk of developing dementia immediately by eating more fruit and vegetables.

The study, published in the British Medical Journal, predicted increasing intake of fruits and vegetables and eliminating diabetes and depression could reduce dementia by 21 percent, while increasing education could reduce new cases of dementia by 18 percent over the next seven years.

“Public health initiatives should focus on encouraging literacy at all ages irrespective of ability, prompt treatment of depressive symptoms and screening for glucose intolerance and insulin resistance — early stages in the development of diabetes,” the study authors say in a statement.

The study was based on data from 1,433 healthy people age 65 and older living in the south of France and recruited from 1999 to 2001. Participants underwent cognitive testing at the start of the study and again at two, four and seven years and gave information on medical history, height, weight, education level, monthly income, mobility, diet and use of alcohol or tobacco.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Education, History, Other0 Comments

Almost All Boomers Worry over Healthcare

NEW YORK, Aug. 6 (UPI) — Ninety-eight percent of baby boomers say they are very worried about being able to afford retirement healthcare coverage, a U.S. survey indicates.

The survey, conducted by Harris Interactive for New York Life Investment Management LLC, indicates 74 percent of baby boomers ages 45-65 who are not yet retired see healthcare costs as either their greatest concern or their second greatest concern for retirement.

More than half of the boomers indicate they would rather work longer to pay for healthcare expenses, rather than give up luxuries in retirement, but 76 percent of baby boomers say they are willing to spend less now to invest for a more comfortable lifestyle.

More than half of the boomers say their Internet connection, shopping for birthdays and special occasions, and pet care as basic needs, while almost half consider annual family vacations or weekend getaways, having eldercare/home aid, professional hair care and funding children/grandchildren’s education as basic needs as well. Boomers say the luxuries most difficult to give up are traveling and dining-out, the survey found.

The survey was conducted from May 3-13 among 1,049 U.S. adults ages 45-65 with a total of $100,000 or more of investable liquid assets. No other survey details were provided.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Education, Other0 Comments

No Posts in Category
Advertisement