Archive | Smoking

Not Having Friends As Bad As Smoking

PROVO, Utah, July 28 (UPI) — Not having adequate social relationships can be as bad for health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day, being an alcoholic or not exercising, U.S. researchers say.

Julianne Holt-Lunstad of Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, and colleagues analyzed data from 148 studies involving 308,849 individuals who were tracked for an average of 7.5 years.

The study, published in the journal PLoS Medicine, finds lack of social connections — friends, family, neighbors or colleagues — can be as harmful as not exercising and twice as harmful as obesity.

“When someone is connected to a group and feels responsibility for other people, that sense of purpose and meaning translates to taking better care of themselves and taking fewer risks,” Holt-Lunstad says in a statement.

“This effect is not isolated to older adults — relationships provide a level of protection across all ages.”

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Other, Smoking0 Comments

Painters at Greater Risk of Bladder Cancer

LYON, France, July 21 (UPI) — People who work as professional painters have a significantly increased risk of developing bladder cancer, researchers in France suggest.

The meta-analysis, published in the journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine, suggests the risk increases the longer a person works as a professional painter.

The authors analyzed almost 3,000 cases of bladder cancer arising in professional painters that were reported in 41 separate studies.

The researchers at the International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France, say after taking account of smoking — smoking is a key risk factor for bladder cancer — painters were still 30 percent more likely to develop bladder cancer than those in the general population. Related occupations, such as plasterers, glaziers, wallpaper hangers, artists and decorators were classified as “painters” in some studies.

The researchers say it is not known which agents in paint may be linked to the increased cancer risk, but the review is complicated by variability of the work, differing levels of exposure and that paint composition has changed over time.

Painters, who were women, were more likely to develop bladder cancer, but only four studies presented results separately for women, the researchers say.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Other, Smoking0 Comments

W.Va. Child Most Apt to Live with Smoker

ROCKVILLE, Md., July 21 (UPI) — Seven-point-six percent of U.S. children live with someone who smokes tobacco at home but the number varies greatly among states, researchers found.

Gopal K. Singh and Michael D. Kogan of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and Mohammad Siahpush of the University of Nebraska Medical Center, used data from the 2007 National Survey of Children’s Health and state-level data on home smoking from the 2006–2007 Current Population Survey — Tobacco Use Supplement.

The rates of children living with a smoker ranged from 1.1 percent for Utah and 1.9 percent for California to a high of 17.9 percent for West Virginia and 17.6 percent in Kentucky.

After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, the researchers said children in Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky and Pennsylvania had 12 times higher odds — and those in Wisconsin, Missouri, Delaware and the District of Columbia had 10 times higher odds — of being exposed to environmental tobacco smoke than children in Utah.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Other, Smoking0 Comments

Young Adults Not Screened for Heart Risk

ATLANTA, July 20 (UPI) — Despite the increasing numbers of young U.S. adults with cardiac risk factors, less than 50 percent are screened for coronary heart disease, researchers say.

Dr. Elena V. Kuklina, Paula W. Yoon and Nora L. Keenan of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta say although recommendations for screening young adults without cardiac risk factors differ, all guidelines recommend screening adults with coronary heart disease, or 1 or more coronary heart disease risk factors — family history of early coronary heart disease, smoking, hypertension or obesity.

The researchers calculated their estimates using data from the 1999-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys for 2,587 young adults — men ages 20-35, women ages 20-45.

The study, published in the July/August issue of the journal Annals of Family Medicine, found about 59 percent of young adults had coronary heart disease, or one or more cardiac risk factors, but the overall screening rate in this population was less than 50 percent.

In addition, after factoring in for sociodemographic and healthcare factors, the study found no significant difference in screening rates between young adults with no risk factors and those with one or more risk factors.

The study also found in 2003 about 60 percent of U.S. adults ages 20-44 had their cholesterol levels checked in the preceding 5 years.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in History, Other, Smoking0 Comments

Cigarettes Plus Wood Smoke May = COPD

ALBUQUERQUE, July 20 (UPI) — Tobacco smokers exposed to wood smoke increased their chance of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, U.S. researchers say.

Researchers at Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute say their findings suggest smokers try to avoid heating or cooking with wood stoves and avoid environments where wood smoke is likely. The researchers also find changes in eight genes in sputum DNA.

The study — published online ahead of print in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine — finds smoking, wood smoke exposure and the changes in sputum DNA increase one’s risk of COPD fourfold. The researchers finds wood smoke exposure significantly and independently linked with an increased risk of respiratory diseases.

“When cigarette smokers are exposed to wood smoke their risk of having reduced lung function increases,” lead author Yohannes Tesfaigzi says in statement. “Cigarette smokers who have both changes in sputum DNA and are exposed to wood smoke have a synergistically increased risk of having reduced lung function and other indicators of COPD such as chronic mucous hypersecretion.”

Tesfaigzi and colleagues collected demographic and smoke exposure information as well as sputum samples — to be analyzed for DNA changes — for more than 1,800 current and former smokers between ages 40-75.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Other, Smoking0 Comments

IVF Children Have Higher Cancer Rate

LUND, Sweden, July 20 (UPI) — A study of children born via in vitro fertilization from 1982 to 2005 found they had a moderately higher cancer rate than others, Swedish researchers found.

Dr. Bengt Kallen of the University of Lund in Sweden and colleagues say earlier studies showed IVF infants had a slightly higher rate of certain birth defects, such as heart problems and cleft palates.

The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, says among the children born via IVF, 53 cases of cancer were found, while — based on normal rates of cancer in children — 38 cases were found in the general population.

Maternal age, parity, smoking, subfertility, previous miscarriages, body mass index and multiple births did not significantly affect cancer risk in the children — but high-birth weight, premature delivery, the presence of respiratory diagnoses and low Apgar score were risk factors for cancer.

“We found a moderately increased risk for cancer in children who were conceived by IVF. This is probably not attributable to the IVF procedure itself but could be an effect of confounding from unidentified characteristics of women who undergo IVF or could act via the widely known increased risks for neonatal complication,” the researchers say in a statement. “It should be stressed that the individual risk for a child who is born after IVF to develop childhood cancer is low.”

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Other, Smoking0 Comments

Smoking: More Habit Than Addiction

TEL AVIV, Israel, July 19 (UPI) — Israeli researchers say cigarette cravings may be more a result of habit rather than addiction.

Researchers from Tel Aviv University suggest their study finding may help explain why nicotine patches and gum are often ineffective but psychologically based smoking cessation programs can be successful.

The study, published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, concluded the intensity of cravings for cigarettes has more to do with psychosocial elements of smoking than with the physiological effects of nicotine.

“These findings might not be popular with advocates of the nicotine addiction theory, because they undermine the physiological role of nicotine and emphasize mind over matter when it comes to smoking,” Dr. Reuvan Dar, the study leader, said in a statement.

Dar and colleagues monitored the craving levels of flight attendants — both women and men — during a long flight of 10-13 hours, as well as shorter two-hop trips where each leg lasted 3-5 hours. They found flight duration had no significant impact on craving levels. In fact, craving levels at the end of each short flight were higher than those at the end of the long flight, the study determined.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Other, Smoking0 Comments

Women: Higher Coronary Artery Disease Risk

HAMILTON, Ontario, July 13 (UPI) — A Canadian researcher warns women with angina are at higher risk than men with angina of coronary artery disease.

Lead author Dr. Catherine Kreatsoulas at McMaster University in Hamilton says a female patient with severe angina has three times the male severe angina patient’s risk of developing coronary artery disease.

The study, published in the Journal of Internal Medicine, finds that adjusting the data for variables commonly associated with coronary artery disease such as diabetes, high-blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking and age increased the coronary artery disease risk by 82 percent in women with severe angina and 28 percent in men of the same age with the same condition.

Kreatsoulas said women with diabetes were particularly at risk.

“Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of ill health and death in men and women in the Western world, accounting for over one-third of deaths. In fact, more women die from coronary artery disease than breast disease,” Kreatsoulas says in a statement.

“Despite this, there is still a persistent perception that coronary artery disease is a man’s disease,” Kreatsoulas says in a statement.

Kreatsoulas and colleagues looked at the records of 23,771 patients referred for first diagnostic angiography over a 6-year period.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Other, Smoking0 Comments

20 Percent of U.S. High-schoolers Smoke

ATLANTA, July 8 (UPI) — Despite declines in U.S. teen smoking in the late 1990s, teen smoking declines stalled from 2003 to 2009, federal health officials found.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report released Thursday said since 2003, the rate of smoking decline in U.S. teens leveled off for whites, Hispanics and blacks — except for black female students, for whom cigarette smoking has shown no decline after 1999.

The report also said in 1991, students who reported cigarette smoking was 27.5 percent, rose to 36.4 percent in 1997, dropped to 21.9 percent in 2003 and leveled off at 19.5 percent in 2009.

However, fewer U.S. high-school students are trying smoking. Student who said they had tried smoking in 1999 declined from 70.4 percent to 58.4 percent in 2003, and then declined more gradually to 46.3 percent in 2009, the report said.

“Although 4 of 5 don’t smoke, it’s discouraging to see that current smoking did not continue to decline more rapidly among youth,” Dr. Thomas R. Frieden, director of the CDC, said in a statement.

“Smoking is the leading preventable cause of death in this country and 9 out of 10 adults started smoking in their teens or earlier. The slow progress since 2003 tells us that much more needs to be done to reduce youth smoking.”

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Other, Smoking0 Comments

Cyberbullying Linked to Mental Issues

TURKU, Finland, July 7 (UPI) — Teen victims and perpetrators of bullying by cellphone or computers are more likely to report psychiatric and physical symptoms, Finnish researchers found.

Dr. Andre Sourander of Turku University in Finland and colleagues had 2,438 Finnish adolescents in seventh- and ninth-grade complete questionnaires and found six months prior to the survey, 4.8 percent of the participants were only victims of cyberbullying, 7.4 percent were cyberbullies only and 5.4 percent were both victims and perpetrators of cyberbullying.

Cybervictims were associated with living in a family with a single parent, emotional difficulties, concentration problems, behavioral problems, problems getting along with others, headache, recurrent abdominal pain, sleeping difficulties and not feeling safe at school.

Being a cyberbully was associated with emotional difficulties, concentration problems, behavioral problems, problems getting along with others, hyperactivity, conduct problems, seldom helping behaviors, frequently smoking or getting drunk, headache and not feeling safe at school.

However, those who were both a cyberbully and cybervictim reported all of these conditions.

“One in four cycbervictims reported that it had resulted in fear for their safety,” the study authors said in a statement. “The feeling of being unsafe is probably worse in cyberbullying compared with traditional bullying. Traditional bullying typically occurs on school grounds, so victims are safe at least within their homes. With cyberbullying, victims are accessible 24 hours a day, seven days a week.”

The findings were reported in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Other, Smoking0 Comments

No Posts in Category
Advertisement