Archive | Wind

Wind Turbine Scrapped at London Olympics

LONDON, June 4 (UPI) — Organizers of the 2012 Olympic games in London say they’ve scrapped plans to build a 393-foot-tall wind turbine to produce green power.

The preferred contractor pulled out and no other contractor has come forward to bid on the job, said David Higgins, head of the Olympic Delivery Authority, which oversees the site’s construction.

The site also lacked enough wind to deliver on promises that the turbine could deliver sufficient energy, The Times of London reported Friday.

“We have carried out an exhaustive process with the industry and suppliers over the last two years to find a viable way of delivering a wind turbine on the Olympic Park site,” Higgins said. “However, the industry environment has changed and that means the project is no longer feasible.”

Alternatives still under consideration include solar panels and a biomass unit, said Higgins, who has promised the 2012 Olympic Games would be the greenest ever with carbon emissions reduced by 50 percent.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

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Don't Expect Partners to Do What You Won't

NEW YORK, May 27 (UPI) — The key to creating and maintaining relationships is you — not your partner, a U.S. psychology author advises.

Anthony O. Nwachukwu, author of “Keeping Human Relationships Together: Self Guide to Healthy Living Studies in Spiritual Psychology vis-a-vis Human Values” — which he describes as a guide for supervising oneself to create and maintain fulfilling relationships — suggests beginning “spiritual psychology” by not blaming current and potential partners, but by having people search inside themselves.

“You can’t expect your partner to be honest when you are selfish and greedy, or to keep an honest relationship with a person you deceive,” Nwachukwu says in a statement.

“It is one thing to tell an unreliable husband to stop deceiving himself, his wife or family, but another to find out why he has such a bad habit and to give him the skills he needs to heal his problem from its root.”

Nwachukwu, who is also a Roman Catholic clergyman, says his insights are based on systematically developed and tested surveys he conducted in West Africa and the United States.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

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Fish Study Offers Wind Farming Ideas

PASADENA, Calif., May 20 (UPI) — A California Institute of Technology researcher says he’s testing concepts for wind farms he developed while observing schooling fish.

Associate Professor John Dabiri, head of the school’s Biological Propulsion Laboratory, said he studies water- and wind-energy concepts that share the theme of bioinspiration — energy-related processes involved in biological systems.

“I became inspired by observations of schooling fish, and the suggestion that there is constructive hydrodynamic interference between the wakes of neighboring fish,” Dabiri said. “It turns out many of the same physical principles can be applied to the interaction of vertical-axis wind turbines.”

He said horizontal-axis wind turbines — those with large propellers — require a substantial amount of land to perform properly. “Propeller-style wind turbines suffer in performance as they come in proximity to one another,” he explained.

But with help from the principles supplied by schooling fish, and the use of vertical-axis turbines, Dabiri said he and his team found there might be substantial benefits to placing vertical-axis turbines in a strategic array, and that some configurations may allow the turbines to work more efficiently as a result of their relationship to others around them.

Vertical turbines have no propellers; he explained. Instead, they use a vertical rotor. Because of this, the devices can be placed on smaller plots of land in a denser pattern.

The research that included graduate students Robert Whittlesey and Sebastian Liska will be tested in a Caltech field demonstration.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Fish, Other, Wind0 Comments

No-till Farming Makes Soil More Stable

MANHATTAN, Kan., May 18 (UPI) — A joint U.S. Department of Agriculture-university study suggests no-till farming can make soil much more stable than plowed soil.

The USDA’s Agricultural Research Service joined a team led by Kansas State University Assistant Professor Humberto Blanco-Canqui in studying the effects of more than 19 years of various tillage practices across the central Plains.

The team discovered no-till stores more soil carbon, which helps bind or glue soil particles together, making the first inch of topsoil two to seven times less vulnerable to the destructive force of raindrops than is plowed soil.

The researchers said the structure of the aggregates in the first inch of topsoil is the first line of defense against soil erosion by water or wind. They said understanding the resistance of such aggregates to the erosive forces of wind and rain is critical to evaluating soil erodibility, especially in semiarid regions where low precipitation, high evaporation and yield variability can interact with intensive tillage to alter aggregate properties and soil organic matter content.

Tillage makes soil less resistant to being broken apart by raindrops because the clumping is disrupted and soil organic matter is lost through oxidation when soil particles are exposed to air.

The study that included the University of Nebraska-Sidney and ARS researchers Maysoon Mikha, Joe Benjamin and Merle Vigil was reported in a recent issue of the Soil Science Society of America Journal.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Other, Soil Erosion, Wind0 Comments

How can we get past the Not In My Back Yard (NIMBY) syndrome when it comes to wind farms?

Posted in Energy & Fuels, Wind0 Comments

Fed Wind Farm Rules May Not Save Birds

WASHINGTON, May 10 (UPI) — The American Bird Conservancy says it fears proposed voluntary guidelines for wind farms will not prevent the deaths of birds by the turbines.

ABC President George Fenwick said Monday he sent letters to Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar and Bureau of Land Management Director Bob Abbey identifying key shortcomings in recent federal plans to address the affects of wind farms on birds.

“I find it ironic that the Interior Department is asking us to believe that the wind industry will follow voluntary guidelines when their own land management agency is not even doing so,” Fenwick said.

Fenwick said the Fish and Wildlife Wind Advisory Committee has made excellent recommendations for the generation of wind power that the conservancy wants adopted throughout the federal government. But Fenwick said the major shortcoming in the recommendations is that they are proposed as voluntary, rather than mandatory, and as such will do little to curb unacceptable levels of bird mortality and habitat loss at wind farms.

“The notion that the wind industry is predominantly made up of small, environmentally conscious operations is one that must be quickly dispelled,” Fenwick said. “These are large, corporate-scale utility companies, not unlike coal and oil conglomerates … with a checkered environmental track record to date. Voluntary guidelines will not change that paradigm, and will work about as well as voluntary taxes.”

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Birds, Coal, Fish, Other, Wind0 Comments

Mixed Reaction on Cape Wind Approval

BOSTON, April 28 (UPI) — The approval of the Cape Wind power project off Massachusetts was cheered by renewable-energy interests but some environmentalists expressed dismay.

U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced approval Wednesday of the $1 billion offshore wind farm, which was seen by some as a source of clean electricity but others saw it as a threat to the Cape Cod ocean environment.

“This bold step by the Obama administration sends a signal that the United States is serious about securing its energy future and is willing to take action to make that happen,” said Tom King, president of National Grid.

National Grid, a company that supplies electricity and natural gas in the Northeast, said in a written statement it was negotiating a power-purchase agreement with Cape Wind.

The offshore turbines weren’t so welcome to environmentalists who feared serious harm to wildlife.

The American Bird Conservatory said it was “disappointed” in the decision because it could disrupt sea-bird habitat and knock too many migratory birds out of the sky.

Salazar said the developer of the wind farm, which will be built on federal submerged land in Nantucket Sound, must agree to minimize the potential adverse impacts of construction and operation of the facility.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Birds, Electricity, Natural Gas, Other, Wind0 Comments

Feds OK Cape Wind Energy Project

BOSTON, April 28 (UPI) — U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced approval Wednesday of the $1 billion Cape Wind renewable energy project off Massachusetts but included a caveat.

Salazar said the developer of the wind farm that will be built on federal submerged land in Nantucket Sound must agree to minimize the potential adverse impacts of construction and operation of the facility.

“After careful consideration of all the concerns … I find the public benefits weigh in favor of approving the Cape Wind project at the Horseshoe Shoal location,” Salazar said in an announcement made at the Massachusetts Statehouse in Boston. “With this decision we are beginning a new direction in our nation’s energy future, ushering in America’s first offshore wind energy facility and opening a new chapter in the history of this region.”

Officials said the wind farm — the first on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf — will generate enough power to meet 75 percent of the electricity demand for the Cape Cod, Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket Island areas combined. It will create several hundred construction jobs and be one of the largest greenhouse gas reduction initiatives in the nation — the equivalent to removing 175,000 cars from the road for a year.

“After almost a decade of exhaustive study and analyses, I believe that this undertaking can be developed responsibly and with consideration to the historic and cultural resources in the project area,” Salazar said. “Impacts to the historic properties can and will be minimized and mitigated and we will ensure that cultural resources will not be harmed or destroyed during the construction, maintenance, and decommissioning of the project.”

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Cars, Electricity, History, Other, Wind0 Comments

Ship with Suspected Toxic Waste Seized

LAGOS, Nigeria, April 16 (UPI) — Nigeria impounded a container ship of unclear ownership and origin that was allegedly laden with toxic waste, customs officials in Lagos said Friday.

The crew and its agents aboard the vessel, identified as the MV Nashville, docked at the Tin Can Island Port at Lagos, were also arrested and detained, pending an investigation, the officials said.

The MV Nashville, whose ownership and nation of origin were unclear late Friday, was alleged to be carrying 70 used lead batteries and broken televisions, officials cited by the allAfrica.com news Web site said.

Mike Zampa, vice president for corporate communications of Singapore’s Neptune Orient Lines, told United Press International the ship was in no way related to his company, despite earlier reports it was.

“It is not our ship. We do not own a ship by that name. We have no vessel service to Nigeria. It’s wrong information,” he said in a phone interview from Singapore.

He said he had no idea whose ship it was. UPI was unable to immediately determine the ship’s owner, operator, origin or destination.

Such ships typically carry their loads in truck-size containers that are sealed intact.

The batteries aboard the MV Nashville were classified as code A1180 under the 1992 Basel Convention, an international treaty designed to reduce hazardous waste movements, specifically from developed countries to less developed countries.

The United States is one of three countries that signed the treaty but failed to ratify it. The two others are Afghanistan and Haiti.

A 1988 dumping of 3,500 tons of toxic waste by an Italian firm in a remote Nigerian coastal town Koko in southern Delta State caused death and injury to people and animals and contaminated lakes and rivers.

Only after environmental groups and Nigerian officials protested that the industrial world was improperly dumping chemical waste in developing countries did Italy order the toxic waste picked up and returned to Europe.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Hazardous Waste, Other0 Comments

Ship with Suspected Toxic Waste Seized

LAGOS, Nigeria, April 16 (UPI) — Nigeria impounded a container ship with possible U.S. ties that was allegedly laden with toxic waste, customs officials in Lagos said Friday.

The crew and its agents aboard the vessel MV Nashville, docked at the Tin Can Island Port at Lagos, were also arrested and detained, pending an investigation, the officials said.

The MV Nashville — a container ship reportedly operated by American President Lines, a subsidiary of Singapore’s Neptune Orient Lines, with a corporate office in Scottsdale, Ariz. — was alleged to be carrying 70 used lead batteries and broken televisions, officials cited by the allAfrica.com news Web site said.

The batteries were classified as code A1180 under the 1992 Basel Convention, an international treaty designed to reduce hazardous waste movements, specifically from developed countries to less developed countries.

The United States is one of three countries that signed the treaty but failed to ratify it. The two others are Afghanistan and Haiti.

Officials did not say where the ship originated or what its final destination was.

Mike Zampa, listed by American President Lines as its director of corporate communications for the Americas, did not immediately respond to a United Press International e-mail seeking confirmation of the report. United Press International calls to a phone number listed for Zampa brought a recording saying the number was disconnected or no longer in service.

A 1988 dumping of 3,500 tons of toxic waste in a remote Nigerian coastal town Koko in southern Delta State by an Italian firm caused death and injury to people and animals and contaminated lakes and rivers.

Only after environmental groups and Nigerian officials protested that the industrial world was improperly dumping chemical waste in developing countries did Italy order the toxic waste picked up and returned to Europe.

Copyright 2010 United Press International, Inc. (UPI). Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI’s prior written consent.

Posted in Hazardous Waste, Other0 Comments

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